9 Things You Should Know When Applying for Another License | Medicus Healthcare Solutions

9 Things You Should Know When Applying for Another License

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If you want to work locum tenens in a different state but have not yet acquired the additional medical license, take heart. Experienced licensing professionals at locum tenens staffing companies like Medicus Healthcare Solutions can answer your questions, offer assistance, and simplify the process. Read on to learn more about what you can expect.

  1. In addition to your updated curriculum vitae (CV) and work history, you will be asked to provide copies of required documents, such as:
      • MD/DO Diploma
      • ECFMG Certificate, if applicable
      • Postgraduate Training Verifications:
        • Internship
        • Residency
        • Fellowship
      • Board Certificate
      • Color copies of your Driver’s License and U.S. Passport
      • Social Security Card
      • Photo
      • ACLS/BLS/PALS/ATLS
    • DEA Certificate(s)
    • Malpractice Documents, if applicable
  2. Some applications are traditional paper documents, while others are based online. A skilled licensing coordinator can prepopulate your application, whether it is physical or digital, filling out as many of the fields as possible before sending it to you via mail, an overnight service, fax, or email for the inclusion of missing data, review, signature(s), and confirmation that the information it contains is complete and accurate.
  3. You are responsible for the application fee and associated charges, such as the cost of a criminal background check, if applicable. (See “Physician Licensure Application Fees and Timelines by State” for more information.)
  4. Boards in several states—including Alaska, Arizona, Maine, New Hampshire, Texas, and Washington—offer temporary physician licenses, which can be a more expedient option for a number of locum tenens providers.
  5. Certain times of the year are busier than others at medical boards, like the spring—when many residents graduate—and the end of the year. If you submit an application during either of these periods, it is possible that extra turnaround time will be required. For example, a process that normally takes four to six weeks might need eight to 10 weeks, depending on the volume of applications coming to the board and the process itself.
  6. Requirements vary by board. For instance, a provider applying for a Pennsylvania medical license must also fulfill licensure requirements for child abuse reporting. A knowledgeable licensing specialist will make you aware of such state-specific conditions.
  7. Some boards require physicians and/or physician assistants applying for a license to use the Federation Credentials Verification Service (FCVS). After your credentials have been verified from primary sources by the FCVS, they are stored in a permanent profile created especially for you and do not need to be re-verified, should you choose to apply for licensure in additional states. Even if you are not obliged to do so, using FCVS is highly recommended as it can streamline the entire process.
  8. All boards require Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) registration. While it is a federal document, the DEA registration is state-specific based on where a provider practices. If you have licenses in New Hampshire and Maine, for instance, and write prescriptions in New Hampshire, you have to have a DEA registration certificate in this state. If you take a locum tenens assignment in Maine, in addition to making sure your Maine license is up to date, you also need DEA registration in this state. You could not write prescriptions in Maine without it. Some locum tenens providers find that registering for a second DEA registration ensures they can move between opportunities—or a permanent position in one state and a locum tenens job in another—without waiting for the grace period that a change of state necessitates.
  9. In many instances, a board will send fingerprint/background packets to the provider, since clinicians handle this step directly. Like other requirements, the process is state-specific. In some cases, for example, you could be fingerprinted by the state police. Then again, you could be required to visit your local police precinct with fingerprint cards you received in the mail, enabling you to be fingerprinted close to home, so you could mail the cards back to the board.

Good communication between all parties—you, your recruiter, and your licensing coordinator—will ensure that all of the different pieces required are provided and all expectations are met.

Medicus Healthcare Solutions’ experienced licensing coordinators can help you with the licensing process in any state. To connect with one of these knowledgeable professionals, please call (855) 301-0563 or email Licensing@medicushcs.com today.

 

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